Broken Links Finder


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Broken Links Finder

Use our free tool to find broken links. We will quickly find all your links and then test each and everyone of those to verify that all your links are working.

Broken links are bad

Google hates broken links, you might get punished for linking sites that does not work and your visitors will for sure not appreciate a 404 being thrown in their face when they expect pictures of funny cats, or whatever they might be looking for. Keeping links valid is a big and important part of running a popular website.

Broken links are often reported as 404, but can also be reported as any other 4xx, depending on the reason for the page not working.

2xx codes are good

All http responses starting with a 2 is usually ok. These are the most common codes that are ok.

  • 200: OK
  • 201: Created
  • 202: Accepted
  • 203: Non-Authoritative Information
  • 204: No Content
  • 205: Reset Content
  • 206: Partial Content

The long big of Bad HTTP codes

Watchout for these codes since they might be an indication of that the link is not working correctly.

  • 300: Multiple Choices
  • 301: Moved Permanently
  • 302: Moved Temporarily (HTTP/1.0)
  • 302: Found (HTTP/1.1)
  • 303: See Other (HTTP/1.1)
  • 304: Not Modified
  • 305: Use Proxy
  • 307: Temporary Redirect
  • 308 Permanent Redirect 

 

  • 400: Bad Request
  • 401: Unauthorized
  • 402: Payment Required
  • 403: Forbidden
  • 404: Not Found
  • 405: Method Not Allowed
  • 406: Not Acceptable
  • 407: Proxy Authentication Required
  • 408: Request Timeout
  • 409: Conflict
  • 410: Gone
  • 411: Length Required
  • 412: Precondition Failed
  • 413: Payload Too Large
  • 414: Request-URI Too Long
  • 415: Unsupported Media Type
  • 416: Requested Range Not Satisfiable
  • 417: Expectation Failed

 

  • 500: Internal Server Error
  • 501: Not Implemented
  • 502: Bad Gateway
  • 503: Service Unavailable
  • 504: Gateway Timeout
  • 505: HTTP Version Not Supported
  • 509: Bandwidth Limit Exceeded